Congress, the Constitution and War: The Limits on Presidential Power - New York Times

Congress, the Constitution and War: The Limits on Presidential Power - New York Times:

But the Constitution also gives Congress an array of war powers, including the power to “declare war,” “raise and support armies” and “make rules concerning captures on land and water.” By “declare war,” the Constitution’s framers did not mean merely firing off a starting gun. In the 18th century, war declarations were often limited in scope — European powers might fight a naval battle in the Americas, for example, but not battle on their own continent. In giving Congress the power to declare war, the Constitution gives it authority to make decisions about a war’s scope and duration.

The Founders, including James Madison, who is often called “the father of the Constitution,” fully expected Congress to use these powers to rein in the commander in chief. “The constitution supposes, what the History of all Governments demonstrates, that the Executive is the branch of power most interested in war, and most prone to it,” Madison cautioned. “It has accordingly with studied care, vested the question of war in the Legislature.”

George Bush, who considers himself an authority on the constitution, just makes shit up. He's such a baby. "I'm the president, and I can do whatever I want."

You can read The Accidental Candidate for details on how little effort George Bush spends thinking about anything.

It's frightening.